ICYMI: Summer Goals Storify

romance writer chat storify graphicIf you weren’t able to catch last Sunday’s chat on summer goals, RWchat co-host C.L. Polk created a Storify highlight reel. Since we’re past the halfway point in the year, participants checked in on whether they’re 50% of the way through their yearly goals, if they need to reassess (“Is this goal still right for me & my career path?”) or course correct (“I’m still aiming for this goal but I have to get back on track.”), and if it’s easier or more difficult to meet goals during the summer.

Join us for the next chat on Sunday, July 16th, where we’ll talk about selling your book!

ICYMI: “Starving Artist” & Other Damaging Creative Myths Storify

romance writer chat storify graphicIf you weren’t able to catch last Sunday’s chat on damaging creative myths, RWchat co-host C.L. Polk created a Storify highlight reel. During the chat, we talked about creative myths like the “starving artist,” the “rich writer” (we’re looking at you Richard Castle and Carrie Bradshaw), and “selling out.”

Join us for the next chat on July 9th, where we’ll talk about summer goals!

The ‘Do’s and Don’t’s’ of the Author/Reviewer Relationship

RWchat romance writer chat reviews graphic

We appreciate when reviewers and librarians chime in during #RWchat to share their insights, so we’re thrilled to share this post from Maria Rose on how to build a good relationship with book reviewers. Also make sure to check out Frannie’s post on Making the Library Your *Fan(girl).

 

Hello everyone! My thanks to Alexis Daria for inviting me to write a guest post for RWChat on the topic of book reviews. Hopefully it will give you some insight into the reviewer perspective of what should be a positive and mutually beneficial reviewer/author relationship.

A little bit about me: I’m a long time reader of romance and in 2014 I started writing reviews for Goodreads (a book review site owned by Amazon) and book sale sites. I now write for 3 main review sites as well as guest review for others. There may be other reviewers with different perspectives than mine, but these are some of the issues I’ve seen come up with authors and fellow reviewers that I think are worth discussing. Note that my thoughts relate to non-professional book review sites/blogs, not RT, Library Journal, Kirkus etc.

Whether you are a new or established author, self-published or traditionally published, everyone can benefit from having their book reviewed. As part of a marketing plan, reviews can help bring visibility to your story, your name and your brand. Here are some tips to make your book stand out in the crowd.

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What’s in a Name?

romance writer chat name tag graphicThis week on #RWchat, we’re talking about heroes and heroines, and today’s guest post comes to us from LaQuette. We asked her to talk about the thoughtful and meaningful names in her Queens of Kings series. Take it away, LaQuette!

 

Hello, I’m LaQuette, your friendly erotic romance author, embracing my crazy…one character at a time.  Speaking of crazy and characters, I’m here to talk to you about my process of name selection for the crazy folks running around in my head.

I was attending a reader/writer event last year when a reader by the name of Shona asked me a thoughtful question about my characters.  She’d read my romantic suspense series, The Queens of Kings, and asked, “You named the Amare family members, Hunter, Law, Free, Justice, True, and Heart.  How did you come up with such unusual names, and what if any significance did the selection of those names have?”  If I didn’t mention that I have smart and perceptive readers, let me tell you now, my readers are the business.

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Balancing the External Plot: Take the Lead

romance writers chat graphic what do they do besides kissThis week on #RWchat, we’re discussing the non-romance plots in our romance novels. In other words, what do the characters do other than kiss? Yesterday we heard from C.L. Polk about Witchmark. Today, Alexis Daria talks about the external plot in her upcoming debut, Take the Lead.

 

How did you come up with the non-romance plot?

I’m a huge fan of Dancing with the Stars, and I was originally inspired by some of the stories they tell through their dances. I made a list of routines like the one in the video below, with the intention of using them as writing prompts.

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